The encryption key is either a plain text file inside the /keys directory or a secret key inside a keystore. If you use a keystore for your AES 128-bit and AES 256-bit encryption …

Let's say you're using a 128-bit AES cipher. The number of possible keys with 128 bits is 2 raised to the power of 128, or 3.4x1038, or 340 undecillion. When it comes to encryption, the rule 128 bit encryption has 88 more bits of key length than 40 bit encryption means there are 2 88 more combinations. 128 bit encryption is very secure and is hard to crack the code. 256 bit encryption is even stronger. Both 128 and 256 makes use of a special algorithm. Advanced Encryption Standard(AES) is a variant of Rijndael which has a fixed block size of 128 bits, and a key size of 128 bits key size, 192-bit key length, or 256-bit encryption. By contrast, Rijndael per se is specified with block and key sizes that may be any multiple of 32 bits, with a minimum of 128 and a maximum of 256-bit encryption AES has now entirely replaced DES worldwide as the default workhorse symmetric encryption standard. How does AES encryption work? The AES encryption algorithm encrypts and decrypts data in blocks of 128 bits. It can do this using 128-bit, 192-bit, or 256-bit keys. AES using 128-bit keys is often referred to as AES-128, and so on. AES is a symmetric block cipher encryption that receives 128-bit size for each block and the size of key is 128, 192, and 256 bits. AES procedure involves some encryption rounds (Nr), which are determined by the cipher key size. The mentioned standard uses 10 rounds in AES-128, 12 rounds in AES-192, and 14 rounds in AES-256. 128-bit encryption, such as what you would find in the AES-128-* cipher is secure. The question of how secure? Let’s put the concept into perspective. 128 bits equates to a value which is much smaller.

AES is a symmetric block cipher encryption that receives 128-bit size for each block and the size of key is 128, 192, and 256 bits. AES procedure involves some encryption rounds (Nr), which are determined by the cipher key size. The mentioned standard uses 10 rounds in AES-128, 12 rounds in AES-192, and 14 rounds in AES-256.

128-bit AES encryption is highly robust, nearly impossible to crack and is still the strong default choice for all traditional commercial applications. Hackers stand no reasonable chance of defeating 128-bit AES encryption and it is accepted as providing a very high level of security.

The actual encryption algorithm is almost the same between all variants of AES. They all take a 128-bit block and apply a sequence of identical "rounds", each of which consists of some linear and non-linear shuffling steps.

The result of the encryption will be the same because you have to feed the AES_ENCRYPT function blocks of 128 bits not higher. If you feed higher then 128, the AES_ENCRYPT insted of breaking the string in 128 bit blocks of data it will just cut of the characters higher then 16. Please prove this wrong – Stefan Creanga Sep 20 '18 at 15:29 AES 128 bit Encryption - social.msdn.microsoft.com Sep 15, 2010 The Advanced Encryption Standard (AES), also known by its original name Rijndael (Dutch pronunciation: [ˈrɛindaːl]), is a specification for the encryption of electronic data established by the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in 2001.